Marietta Estate Planning in the Comfort of Your Home

Will the state get my money if I die without a will in Georgia?

This is a question I get a lot. Many, many clients express to me that they were motivated to get their Wills done because they were afraid if they passed away without a Will “the state would get their money”.

However, that’s not really what happens. There are a couple of issues at play: (1) Who gets your money if you pass away without a Will in Georgia; and (2) if the state will get your money.

To answer the first issue, if you pass away without a Will in Georgia, where your probate estate passes is determined by Georgia law. Georgia law says that if you die without a Will, your probate estate will be shared among your spouse and children, and if none, then it passes to your parents, and if they aren’t living it will pass to your siblings. Your probate estate includes any property you own in your individual name (and not joint with right of survivorship) and any accounts that do not have a beneficiary form or accounts on which your estate is named as beneficiary. Assets that are owned jointly or have beneficiary forms pass outside the Will. This distribution of assets may sound reasonable, but most married couples wish for their spouse to get everything, and for the assets to pass to the kids upon the spouse’s death.

To answer the second question, no, in most cases the state will not get your money. A couple of cases in which the state could end up with your money is if you owed estate taxes, or if you had no living relatives. If you had a very large estate ($5.25 million if you passed away in 2013), anything over amount that would be taxed and could end up in the hands of the federal and/or state government. You could possibly avoid that by doing some tax planning in your Will. If you died without a Will and had NO living relatives (meaning no parents, siblings, spouse, children, aunts, uncles, cousins, nieces or nephews, etc.) your estate could pass to the state (it’s called “escheating” to the state). That would be an unusual situation, but it happens. You could avoid that by doing a Will and naming friends or charities to inherit your property.

If you want to learn more about Wills in Georgia, call Sarah White, Marietta estate planning attorney, at 678-453-6490 or email me at sarah@lawyersarah.com. I will be happy to talk with you for free over the phone. I work with clients in the northern Atlanta suburbs, including Marietta, Woodstock, Kennesaw, Canton, Cartersville, Acworth, Smyrna, and Roswell.